Tag Archives: Homecurry Tips

Quest for Food

I am an avid FOOD JUNKIE. I love to read articles on food, buy and hoard food magazines and devour every recipe book as if there is no tomorrow. Infact, Puneet and I, in our quest for GOOD FOOD have managed to scour every small dhaba and restaurant in the vicinity. (By vicinity I mean a 150 Kms odd). We drove to Murthal from Gurgaon and back on a Sunday morning to have parathas and chai. Driven at 0400 hrs from Chennai on the Trichy highway for some great coffee and companionship . Infact, in my 38th week of pregnancy, Puneet and I, drove to Ashoka Road, New Delhi and Saravana Bhavan-Connaught Circus to have great Andhra food and South Indian meals, Murthal for its divine stuffed Parathas two days in a row, since with a child these trips would not have been possible for sometime to come. I guess, my husband and I are crazy, and its this craziness and passion for food that brought us together in the first place.

Dont get me wrong, its not as if I hate 5 star hotels, I have worked with them, but I would never travel or move mountains to eat in a 5 star hotel. I find most food there without any depth, similar in flavors and taste. They are over priced, pretentious in their portion sizes and their fancy presentations and twist to classics dont get my adrenalin going. Dal Bukhara at ITC and Dimsums at The House of Ming are to die for, but I wont necessarily travel all the way for the fare. On the other hand, I can travel by a cycle rickshaw to bylanes of Chandni Chowk for the perfect, melt in the mouth Dahi Bhallas of Nataraj(measly Rs 10) and make the much dreaded trip to my in-laws in Lucknow for the best ever, cool, tangy and delicious Batashe at Royal Cafe, Hazratganj and risk having Gastro-entritis in my lookout for the best, potent-ly sweet, ginger and mint sugarcane juice at roadside carts all over Gurgaon.

Nowadays, the hunt for the soft and crispy baturas and spicy chhole is on. That means trips to Haldirams/Bikanervalas/Om Sweets of the world. Traveling to Karnal to have chachas chhole-baturas at his roadisde greasy shop, pigging out at innumerable stalls and carts in NCR, fighting and debating till we reach a consensus on the same. SLURP!!! SLURP!!! Kaput goes my diet…….flying out of the window

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The Fantastic Edible Egg

Eggs can be used for so many recipes, they are good to eat, and they have little air holes in the shells. Eggs roll, wobble around and they come from a chicken!
According to the American Egg Board one large egg has 70 calories and provides 13 nutrients. Eggs are an affordable source of high-quality protein including all nine essential amino acids, as well as healthy unsaturated fats and lutein and zeaxanthin, two antioxidants that contribute to eye health.
Several people have asked me about eggs. How long can you keep them? How to know if they are bad and how to store eggs.
Below is a list of facts and tips about eggs. I hope you find something that interests you.
1. Eggs last longer if stored with the wide end up. They have an air pocket and this will give more distance between the yolk and the air pocket that may harbor bacteria.
2. Eggs will absorb refrigerator odors. Store them in their original containers or a closed container of some sort.
3. Don’t taste batter containing raw eggs.
4. Freeze egg whites in ice-cube trays for use in recipes.
To freeze whole eggs or yolks crack them into a bowl and gently stir to break up the yolk somewhat. Try not to incorporate air into the eggs. Label the container with the date and the number of eggs. They can be kept frozen for a year, and should be thawed in the refrigerator the day before you intend to use them.
5. Allow 2 eggs per person when scrambling eggs if adding cheese or other ingredients. If not adding anything to scrambled eggs allow 3 eggs per person.
6. For fluffy scrambled eggs, add 1 to 2 teaspoons of cream per egg.
7. It is easier to separate whites from yolks if the eggs are at room temperature.
8. Cold water works better for cleaning utensils with egg on them.
9. In recipes always use large eggs unless recipes state differently.
10. To determine if an egg is good, drop into cold water. If the egg sinks and lies on its side, it is a good egg. If it floats to the top, it is bad.
11. To peel boiled eggs easily, add salt to the water before boiling and rinse eggs in cold water before peeling.
12. Hard boiled eggs will keep in the refrigerator for a week. The shelf life of an uncooked egg in the refrigerator is about 4 weeks.
Now some facts about the producers of the incredible egg from Funshun:
On average, a hen lays 300 eggs per year.
Nine egg yolks have been found in one chicken egg.
A mother hen turns her egg approximately 50 times in a day. This is so the yolk does not stick to the shell.
To produce a dozen eggs, a hen has to eat about four pounds of feed.
The largest chicken egg ever laid weighed a pound and had a double yolk and shell.
A chicken with red ear lobes will produce brown eggs, and a chicken with white ear lobes will produce white eggs.
A chicken is 75% water.
In the U.S., approximately 46% of the chicken that is eaten by people comes from restaurants or other food outlets.
Hens will produce larger eggs as they grow older.